bogleech:

florafaunagifs:

Leaf bug (Phyllium giganteum)

The constant wobbling as they move is a part of their disguise, making it seem as though the “leaf” is only moving because of a light breeze.

If you blow on one it will also shake around in the hopes of matching any actual surrounding leaves

(via theprincessplant)

dendroica:

Iceland’s Seabird Colonies Are Vanishing, With “Massive” Chick Deaths

Iceland, circled by the food-rich currents of Atlantic, Arctic, and polar waters, is the Serengeti for fish-eating birds. Its rocky coast, hillocky fields, and jutting sea cliffs are breeding grounds for 23 species of Atlantic seabirds, hosting an indispensable share of Atlantic puffins, black murres, razorbills, great skuas, northern fulmars, and black-legged kittiwakes.
But the nests have gone empty in the past few years, and colonies throughout the North Atlantic are shrinking.
The suspected culprits are many. But the leading candidates are the array of profound changes under way in the world’s oceans—their climate, their chemistry, their food webs, their loads of pollutants.
Warming oceans and earlier thaws are driving away the seabirds’ prey; unleashing deadly, unseasonal storms; and knocking tight breeding schedules off-kilter. Mounting carbon dioxide absorption and melting glaciers are acidifying and diluting the aquatic balance, jeopardizing marine life and the creatures that depend on it for food.

(Read more)

dendroica:

Iceland’s Seabird Colonies Are Vanishing, With “Massive” Chick Deaths

Iceland, circled by the food-rich currents of Atlantic, Arctic, and polar waters, is the Serengeti for fish-eating birds. Its rocky coast, hillocky fields, and jutting sea cliffs are breeding grounds for 23 species of Atlantic seabirds, hosting an indispensable share of Atlantic puffins, black murres, razorbills, great skuas, northern fulmars, and black-legged kittiwakes.

But the nests have gone empty in the past few years, and colonies throughout the North Atlantic are shrinking.

The suspected culprits are many. But the leading candidates are the array of profound changes under way in the world’s oceans—their climate, their chemistry, their food webs, their loads of pollutants.

Warming oceans and earlier thaws are driving away the seabirds’ prey; unleashing deadly, unseasonal storms; and knocking tight breeding schedules off-kilter. Mounting carbon dioxide absorption and melting glaciers are acidifying and diluting the aquatic balance, jeopardizing marine life and the creatures that depend on it for food.

(Read more)

(via theprincessplant)

Hawaii: How Monsanto Annihilated a Paradise

badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista:

(Thanks to bad-dominicana for posting this on her twitter, which got my attention).

Check this out…

(via theprincessplant)

marine-science:

Methods of coral restoration are being applied in many parts of the world, including Florida, Mozambique and the Caribbean islands. Fast growing, branching species are being reared by conservationists and scientists and used for “reef seeding” projects. 

"It sounds quite novel, but in fact its a science thats been around for about 30 years. One of the reasons why I’m drawn to it is because its a very active way to get people physically involved in protecting the ocean."

Photo credits: top, middle, second from bottom, bottom

(via theprincessplant)

libutron:

Torch Ginger - Etlingera elatior

The Torch Ginger is a terrestrial and perennial herb belonging to the species Etlingera elatior (Zingiberales - Zingiberaceae), native to Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, and Malaysia. It is also widely cultivated and naturalized in South East Asia.

Inflorescences of the Torch Ginger are truly stunning. The large, torch-like, up to 1.5 m tall flower stalks emerge from fleshy underground rhizomes. The inflorescences have waxy, red to pink, white-edged bracts and are pinecone-shaped with a skirt of larger bracts. The individual flowers emerge from between the colorful bracts and have a dark red labellum (lip petal) with a bright yellow margin. The flowers are followed by green to reddish fruit.

Beside its beauty this plant is edible. The showy pink inflorescences are widely used as cooking herb (in the curries), and eaten raw for its medicinal properties to treat earache; while the leaves are also used for cleaning wounds. 

A research on the pharmacological potential of the Torch Ginger flowers shown that the methanol extract possesses broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal activity (in vitro). 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: [Top: ©Joana Garrido | Locality: Singapore, 2007] - [Bottom: ©Alex Stehouwer | Locality:  San Pablo City, Calabarzon, Philippines, 2013]

(via theprincessplant)

hiddensky:

……Ahhh, soooo like I was saying, let’s be responsible consumers and do our research AND responsible influencers/health professionals and not promote BS!!! ___________________________________ #SomebodyHadToSayIt #BoycottWaistTrainers ❌ #ImOkWith #LosingFollowers #ForSharingTheTRUTH #IMightHaveJustSavedYou #AnExpensiveMedicalBill #PleaseDoYourResearch #OnTheHealthRisks …. HEALTH BEFORE ANYTHING ELSE!!! Please TAG whomever you think should see this image. It’s important we, as a health & fitness community bring attention and awareness on this topic. ✊ by followthelita

trilliondollarbillz

hiddensky:

……Ahhh, soooo like I was saying, let’s be responsible consumers and do our research AND responsible influencers/health professionals and not promote BS!!! ___________________________________
#SomebodyHadToSayIt #BoycottWaistTrainers ❌ #ImOkWith #LosingFollowers #ForSharingTheTRUTH #IMightHaveJustSavedYou #AnExpensiveMedicalBill #PleaseDoYourResearch #OnTheHealthRisks …. HEALTH BEFORE ANYTHING ELSE!!! Please TAG whomever you think should see this image. It’s important we, as a health & fitness community bring attention and awareness on this topic. ✊ by followthelita

trilliondollarbillz